“Knowing I loved my books, he furnish’d me from mine own library with volumes that I prize above my dukedom.” ~William Shakespeare (The Tempest, I, ii)

[This post is the sixth installment in the series I call “Life Letters to My Nephews,” or LLTMN.]

Hi Boys, Ant Kristi here again. How can it be that we’re nearing the end of yet another school year and that you’re all growing up so impossibly fast?  And yes I know how old that makes me sound, so hush.

(Today’s topic was spurred by my annual birthday shopping trip with Hudson, 11 years old already this year!  A few days ago we went to a local bookstore, as we do each year, to get the free Kids Club birthday cookie or cupcake they give away in their cafe.  On the drive over there, I’d asked him what he thought he wanted to get for his birthday gift this year; he rattled off a weird sci-fi sounding name of something I had no idea what was [it was a video game, or a Wii game, or some game of a system I’m not familiar with].

So I was extremely and pleasantly surprised when, after most of a peanut butter cup cookie had been consumed by his 11-year old sweet tooth, Hudson agreed to browse the books for a while to look for a bibliophile birthday gift instead an electronic whatever.  He’d told me about a book he’d read recently from the school library that he really liked (something about a secret underground world that’s always dark and a group of kids that had to rally around a cause to save their people from the bad guys and find more light for their city), and that it was first in a series of four; we found the series (The City of Ember series by Jeanne DuPrau) in the kids’ section and I offered to get the remaining three books for him for his birthday gift instead of the game.  I held my breath a little as he looked at the covers of each one and weighed his options; he finally agreed but only after some bargaining – he’d forget about the game but only if I’d also agree to get him a fourth book, a comic book novel.  We struck a deal and we were both very happy about it!

 

Hudson & his birthday books.

Hudson & his birthday books.

Some of the birthday shopping trip gifts Hudson has picked out in the last few years have included: plastic Wolverine claw glove-type contraptions; Lego sets (of course); and model dragons, horses and knights.  All had their appeal, but I was glad he picked something that would encourage a little more brain power this time.

Hudson immediately started reading the comic book novel on the ride home, and as we pulled up to the house, his 9 year old brother ran over to the car, anxiously peering through the window to see what his brother had brought home.  (Before we’d left, Truman had spouted off a few ideas of his own for video games that he thought Hudson should get.)  “What did you get?” he asked as Hudson opened the door; “Books,” said Hudson as he held them up.  “What??  Why?!”  Truman stomped off into the house with a scowl on his face.

Hudson disappeared into the house too and continued to read one of his books for the next half hour or so.  Then little brother Wyatt got home and the first question he asked was “Hudson, what did you get?!” “Books,” said Hudson from his reading perch on the stairs.  Wyatt’s 4-year old eyes got very wide & he threw his hands in the air. “JUST BOOKS?! Nothing else?!”  “Just books, and that’s OK,” I answered since Hudson was lost in his reading.  Wyatt couldn’t take it: “YOU DIDN’T GET ANY TOYS??!  Not even one?  That’s STUPID Hudson!” And he ran upstairs, on the verge of tears because his brother apparently wasted a perfectly good birthday shopping trip by only getting books…)

Ok boys, so now I’m going to tell you why books are better than toys or video games or phone apps.  Books are like Star Trek transporters for the brain – they can beam you to any place in the world, any world, as if by magic.  I’m pretty sure you already know this though – because pretty much each night of your life, starting from the time you were each very little, books at bedtime has been a regular ritual.  (It’s a good one to have, much better than playing a video game or watching an episode of a humdrum sitcom before bed.)  But books can take you anywhere you want to go: deep into space amongst the stars, back into medieval times of knights and round tables, or even into the world of wizards and warlocks.  The sky is not the limit, and you can go there as well.  I know you think games and apps can do this too, but the written word is always more powerful and meaningful than any game you might play.

Books make you smarter, not just by improving your reading and vocabulary skills, but because each time you read a story about another country or a past president or how the West was won, you’re learning about the ways of the world and putting power into your mind that you can use later.  There are many people out there who never learn to read during their life, which is very sad; can you imagine not being able to read your favorite stories and learn about new things all the time?  You’re very lucky that you know how to read and that you’re learning to read better all the time; maybe one day you can go help other people learn to read so you can help them discover all those other worlds too.

It’s sad to me that one day we might not have many more real, actual books to read; it’s very possible that by the time you’re all adults, all books in our society will be online and electronic.  And while progress will march on, I’m glad you’re getting to hold and experience real books right now; there’s just something about being able to hold that adventure in your hands and turn the paper pages yourself, or being able to take that book with you from place to place as a mini-treasure that’s yours and no one else’s.  I have a few books that I’ve held onto for a very long time now that are important to me, and I hope you get to do the same.  Go to libraries every chance you get, because they might not be around when you’re older; it’s fun to look for new books on the shelves that you didn’t even know existed.  It’s like a little library lottery each time you go, because you get to go home with something new and exciting.  It’s a shame they don’t have Bookmobiles anymore (Google it), I always used to get so excited when I’d see that big blue bus pull up to our school.

Books can make you laugh, and cry, and maybe even influence what you end up doing with your life at different times.  A line in a book was what made me decide to go to Africa with the Peace Corps and live there for two years; I read it while standing in a bookstore and I just knew right there and then that I had to go.  Reading books like “Where the Red Fern Grows” when I was a little girl (and “The Story of Edgar Sawtelle” as an adult) made me love dogs as much as I do.  In seventh grade a teacher had us read “Rebecca” by Daphne DuMaurier; that may have been the actual moment I began to wonder about and be captivated by England and it’s scenery.  (“Rebecca” is still on my nightstand as I write this.)

Books will make you a better person.  When I was a little girl, books were always what I wanted first and foremost for every birthday and holiday…yes, stuffed animals and model horses also made the list, but it was books that made the best gifts for me.  I was proud to be a bookworm, and I will gladly support you if you want to be one too.

Always.

Love,

Ant Kristi

ant-with-flower

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